Category Archives: health benefits

“Sharing economy” is a euphemism for exploitation

CBS has a post up titled 5 ways the “sharing” economy works against workers. For those who don’t know, “sharing economy” refers to companies like AirBnB and Uber that have non-employees rent out private property like appartments or cars, and … Continue reading

Posted in exploitation, health benefits, Modes of control, workers' rights | Leave a comment

Moving stories vs true stories

Watched “Dallas Buyers Club” last night: Jared Leto is very impressive! The story itself, however: when one looks at the facts, this is a story of how FDA procedures worked, getting a drug approved rather quickly that is still used … Continue reading

Posted in health benefits, health care, media, science-based medicine | Leave a comment

Body modifications for non-medical reasons should require consent

The Nordic countries show off their level of civilization again: During a meeting in Oslo, Nordic ombudsmen for children, Nordic paediatricians, and paediatric surgeons agreed a resolution urging their national governments to work for a ban on non-therapeutic circumcision of … Continue reading

Posted in health benefits, health care policy, religion, secularism | Leave a comment

Coda to the MC discussion on feministe.us

It looks as if the comment thread of the MC post on feministe.us is permanently closed, so I’ll use this roundabout way to clarify my point once more. A user named macavitykitsune replied to me: You know what, it’s possible … Continue reading

Posted in belief systems, health benefits, health care, health care policy, Hypocrisy, religion, secularism | 4 Comments

Why would feminists support male circumcision?

I am subscribed to the RSS feed of the http://www.feministe.us blog and every time I read I learn a lot. I used to think of myself as a man supporting women’s emancipation but I’ve learned in the last three years, … Continue reading

Posted in health benefits, health care, health care policy, pseudo-science, science, science-based policy, secularism | 1 Comment